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National Greyhound Adoption Month: 10 Facts and Myths About the Breed

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April is National Greyhound Adoption Month! These 30 days are dedicating to promoting greyhound adoption and educating the public about this wonderful breed!
 
What can you do to participate?
 
Display your dogs. Contact your adoption group and offer to do meet and greets for them. If you are not near a group, call busy local businesses and ask if you can set up an exercise pen and do your own meet and greet at their facility. The Greyhound Project has produced an informative brochure for potential adopters that you may print and distribute.
 
Dogs on parade. The best way to build awareness for greyhounds is getting the dogs out in public. Whether you walk alone or with a group, you are sure to turn some heads. Consider joining a walk for another cause; a group of greyhounds is sure to get the media’s attention.
 April is National Greyhound Adoption Month! These 30 days are dedicating to promoting greyhound adoption and educating the public about this wonderful breed!
 
What can you do to participate?
 
Display your dogs. Contact your adoption group and offer to do meet and greets for them. If you are not near a group, call busy local businesses and ask if you can set up an exercise pen and do your own meet and greet at their facility. The Greyhound Project has produced an informative brochure for potential adopters that you may print and distribute.
 
Dogs on parade. The best way to build awareness for greyhounds is getting the dogs out in public. Whether you walk alone or with a group, you are sure to turn some heads. Consider joining a walk for another cause; a group of greyhounds is sure to get the media’s attention.
 
Teach the children.
Approach your local schools, libraries, or scouting organizations to set up opportunities for teaching and distributing brochures.
 
10 Facts and Myths About Greyhounds
 
Anthropologists generally agree that the Greyhound-type dog can be traced back over 8,000 years to early cave drawings and decorative artifacts and are sometimes referred to as the oldest purebred dog.
 
The greyhound is the only dog mentioned by name in the Bible. King James Version, Proverbs, 30:29-31.
 
The origin of the name “greyhound” has no relation to color. Only about 1/2 of 1% of all greyhounds are gray, and those are referred to as “blue.”
 
Greyhounds are by far the fastest breed of dog, and can reach speeds in excess of 40 miles per hour for short distances.
 
In early Arabian culture, the birth of a Greyhound was a cause for great celebration and second only to the birth of a son.  They were the only dogs permitted to share an Arab’s tent or ride atop his camel.
 
Greyhounds became the first European dog in the New World when they accompanied Christopher Columbus on his second expedition, which set sail from Spain in September 1493.
 
Myths
 
Greyhounds are high strung: Greyhounds are like many other breeds of dogs; some are more energetic than others.  But, for the most part, they are laid back and calm. They have an exceptionally gentle nature and do not need the amount of exercise that a lot of other large-breed dogs require.  They seldom bark except during play or with other greyhounds.
 
Greyhounds need lots of space to run: Greyhounds CAN run, but they do not necessarily need to run.  They can and do run if they have the opportunity (in a fenced-in area), but most people are surprised to see them run only a very short time before they are ready to quit.  They have short bursts of energy followed by a nice long nap!  They are essentially sprinters and run for short distances at top speeds.  They are not long-distance runners.  Like all dogs, they need average exercise and a leash walk is sufficient.
 
Greyhounds have health problems: Actually greyhounds can live from 12 to 15+ years of age with average care.  With the exception of old healed track-related injuries (like broken legs which usually do not impact the dog's status as a pet) most greyhounds are healthy and resilient.  They do not suffer from genetic problems (like hip dysplasia) that are typical in other large breeds of dogs.  The health problems they experience as they get older are no different than what would be experienced in any other breed of dog.
 
Greyhounds are shy and aloof: Greyhounds have been with humans and other dogs constantly from the moment they are born and are the most sociable of all dogs!  They have been raised in kennels with at least 20-80 other dogs from the time they are born.  They are allowed to be puppies and do puppy things like play with each other, sniff, explore, chase, chew, etc.  They are also handled by their trainers from an early age and, as a result, they are used to interacting with humans. 
 
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